Moire reduction action set

54.85$

Are you tired of the ugly moire patterns that keep tainting your images? You’re not the only one! Extend your moire fighting techniques and try using advanced tricks like channel mixing, stage resizing, Lab mode and frequency splitting – all made easy with the actions.

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Photoshop CC 2017, 2018 or 2019 (English version) is required for this product to be used.

The actions from the MOIRE_Killer set help you to reduce moire and in some cases you will be able to remove it completely. As there are many reasons why moire is present on digital images, there's no guarantee that a particular action will work on a particular image.

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The MOIRE_killer set contains five actions. The first action called “stage_size” is supposed to help you fight interpolation moire, that's what happens when you drastically reduce the image size, especially when you use the Bicubic Sharper interpolation algorithm. When you have a very sharp image with complex texture or just an image with a complex texture like checkers, small stripes et cetera and you resize it, you get a moire pattern all over the image. What you can try is use the “stage_size” action. When resizing occurs gradually, the images tend to be less moire prone. I'll save a copy of this image resized to 1000 pixels in height in one step and then resize it once again by using the action. It doesn't resize much, so it's better if you use it a couple of times or even three times, just be careful and don't resize too much, less than 1000 pixels in height. After that, I'll use the Image Size to set the size to 1000 and you can compare it with the other image. After stage resizing, there's no moire pattern. But it only works with moire that was not present in the original image.

The “channel_mixer” action can be useful when you have moire on the image, and it was always there, it's not like you caused it yourself by resizing or something like that. I'll run the action, and in the Channel Mixer prompt, my task is to get a clear image, that is, without any moire. Sometimes, if you're lucky, you get this clear image straight away, but sometimes you'll have to do some actual mixing. I'll set the Green channel to +66 and the Blue to +34, and the Red will stay 0. It's good when the sum of the channels is 100%, but it's not absolutely necessary. After pressing Enter, I get the High Pass prompt, and here you need to use a Radius big enough to blur the moire pattern. Yes, it does work like a blurring filter in this particular action. 20 is too much, and 4 seems quite enough.

That's it. Don't be surprised that the moire pattern is back, the result is there, it's just masked. Use the eraser on the mask where you want to remove the moire and it will be gone.

In some rare cases the blurring effect of the High Pass filter will be affecting your image in a nasty way. Like here, when the shirt is covered in moire, and I run the action to get rid of it, it takes a really huge number in the High Pass prompt to remove the pattern, and the color from the jackets leaks onto the shirt after you wipe through the mask. If that happens, don't worry. Hold Control key and click on the mask to get a selection of the affected area. Flatten the image, that's important, and use the Brush in Color mode to colorize the area within the selection and that's it. Compare with the original image and you'll see that the result is quite good.

The hue action works exactly the same, but instead of the Channel Mixer prompt you get a Hue/Saturation prompt where you move the Hue slider, and if that doesn't help, the Saturation slider to get a black and white image without any moire. It takes -117 in the Hue in this case. 4 in the High Pass, wipe through the mask and the moire is gone.

The lab action uses the Lab color mode. This method is used by many photographers, and I included this action in the pack so that they won't ask me where it is, as it's kinda popular. I couldn't find an image it worked best on, especially when it has the Channel Mixer method to compete with. But still, let me show you how it works. Run the action, and you'll get the Apply Image prompt. Once again, your task here is to get a clear black and white image. It uses the inverted b channel by default, try a channel, try them both inverted and not inverted. Seems that the inverted b works better than the rest of them. As for the blending modes, try Overlay and Soft Light, too. I'll stay with Hard Light. Then Opacity. Seems that it's the best at 100%. Press OK. You will get two Gaussian Blur prompts where you should use a radius big enough to blur the moire pattern completely, and you have to do it twice. I'll stick to 4. Good. Now it offers you to flatten the image, as we're going back to RGB from Lab, say Don't Flatten.

Now, as usual, wipe through the mask. The image has slightly changed its tone, so after you finish with unmasking, it would be wise to switch back to the image from the mask and use a curve to fix the tone shift. That's it.

The last action, which is called “split_frequencies” is the most destructive of them all. Use it only when nothing else works. At the first prompt, use a Radius so big that it blurs all the moire stripes. In this case, 4 is enough. At the second prompt, use a Radius so small that moire doesn't start to appear in the image, let's say 0.5. Now wipe through the mask, carefully. The result is not as good as before, but if I switch to the gray image and apply some Noise to it, like 1%, it will be much better. The action wipes away the whole frequency where the moire is supposed to sit, and it doesn't have any mercy on the texture. Use with caution.

Sometimes you can just use a Brush to color moire and get rid of it quickly, but if not, moire killing action set will help you deal with all possible moire problems.

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A detailed description of the contents:

Action 1: stage_size
Type: Action, automatic
When to run: in case the image gets interpolation moire when resized normally
Requires to run: no requirements
What it does: the action reduces the image size three times, to 90% of the original each time
Output: the same image, but smaller
User intervention: none
Possible alteration: you can change the percentage of the Image Size command if 90% is not enough

Action 2: channel_mixer
Type: Action, semi-automatic
When to run: on high-res images covered in monochrome and colored moire that can't be colorized
Requires to run: RGB image. Can be used on a layer
What it does: after getting a moire-free black&white image from the channel mixer, the action uses the High Pass filter to catch and suppress the moire pattern
Output: a masked High Pass layer
User intervention: the user has to adjust the Channel Mixer settings to get a moire-free black&white image. After the action has finished its work, all that's left is wiping through the mask with the Eraser tool to reveal the moire reduction effect. Works best on single-colored surfaces. In case there are color spots, the High Pass will most probably blur them just like the moire pattern, and after wiping through the mask it would be necessary to colorize the result manually with the brush in Color mode or likewise
Possible alteration: none

Action 3: hue
Type: Action, semi-automatic
When to run: on high-res images covered in monochrome and colored moire that can't be colorized, and when the channel_mixer action didn't prove to be useful
Requires to run: RGB image. Can be used on a layer
What it does: it works just the same way as the channel_mixer. The only difference is that you get a Hue/Saturation prompt instead of the Channel Mixer. You have to move both the Hue and the Saturation sliders to achieve a moire-free black&white image.
Output: a masked High Pass layer
User intervention: After the action has finished its work, all that's left is wiping through the mask with the Eraser tool to reveal the moire reduction effect. Works best on single-colored surfaces. In case there are color spots, the High Pass will most probably blur them just like the moire pattern, and after wiping through the mask it would be necessary to colorize the result manually with the brush in Color mode or likewise
Possible alteration: none

Action 4: LAB
Type: Action, semi-automatic
When to run: on high-res images covered in monochrome and colored moire that can't be colorized, and when "channel_mixer" or "hue" actions didn't help
Requires to run: RGB image. Can be used on a layer
What it does: the action reduces the moire by converting the image to the LAB mode, applying one of the channels to the Lightness channel in Hard Light, Overlay or Soft Light mode with some percentage, blurring both A and B channels with the Gaussian Blur filter and converting back to RGB mode again
Output: a masked layer on top of the original layer
User intervention: when the Apply Image window pops up, you have to adjust the settings to get a moire-free black&white image on the preview. You can do so by changing the channel being applied from B to A, try both inverted or not, change the Blending mode from Hard Light to Soft Light or Overlay, and also try adjusting the Opacity. Yes, it's that tricky. When you're ready to proceed, press Enter. At the Gaussian Blur prompt, increase the Radius until moire pattern disappears, and don't be shy, you can use big values without any problems. Same at the second Gaussian Blur prompt. And when Photoshop offers you to Flatten the image, click on the Cancel button. Now all that's left is wipe through the mask to reveal the effect. If there's a color or tone shift, you'll probably have to apply some Curve to the upper layer to fix it.
Possible alteration: none

Action 5: split_frequencies
Type: Action, semi-automatic
When to run: when monochrome moire cannot be removed with the rest of the actions
Requires to run: RGB image. Can be used on a layer
What it does: the action utilizes the frequency separation technique to remove moire from a pattern and replace it with the high-frequency texture
Output: a masked layer on top of the original layer
User intervention: at the Gaussian prompt, you have to gradually increase the radius until the moire pattern is completely blurred. At the High Pass prompt, you have to pick a radius small enough so that the moire pattern is not visible. After that you can reveal the effect by wiping through the mask, just don't expect too much as the method is very destructive. You can also switch to the gray layer and apply some noise – it often helps a lot to make things look more natural.
Possible alteration: none

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