Chroma Key Isolation action

31.34$

Remove the green screen from your images quickly and easily. You don’t have to click around with the Magic Wand or twiddle with the Select Color Range. Just run the action, and it will either provide you with a great result, or get you started – it all depends on the initial image, and especially the green screen quality.

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Photoshop CC 2017, 2018 or 2019 (English version) is required for this product to be used.

Do you hate chroma keying as much as I do? What seemed so easy in the videos, turned out to be a horror? Can't choose between tedious clicking with the Magic Wand and buying expensive plug-ins that don't work so perfectly? Now there's another option.

 

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If you need to remove chroma key green screen from an image, the “Chromakey isolation” action set will be of help. All you have to do is open an image, and it has to be flat, no layers. There are two actions in the set, the “Chromakey_isolation” and the “Chromakey_isolation_plus”. The first one works on its own. Just run it and you'll get the original image on a separate layer, masked where the green background was initially. If the photographer did their job well, you can even preserve fine details, like bubbles here, but that would be more visible on a black background. The action puts the image on white by default, but you can easily change that by replacing the white background with any other color. You can do it manually in the end, or you can do it permanently by clicking twice on the last command in the action, which is the Fill, and picking Color as its contents. After you've selected the color, the action will use it the next time it runs.

The action is very simple and it doesn't do any miracles. When you have hundreds of green screen images that don't pay enough to sit and twiddle with each, “Chromakey_isolation” will get you started. But if you need a better result, use the second action.

This image here is far from perfect: it's dark, the backdrop is not very saturated. There's a green color cast on this guy's hand. But let's try the “Chromakey_isolation_plus” action to see if we can deal with all these problems. Unlike the first one, this action doesn't run on its own. It will ask you for input quite a few times.

The first time it will give you a prompt where you have to click on the “Don't flatten” button. That's just Photoshop warning you about changing color modes, it's inevitable. Then you get a Levels prompt where you need to move the sliders to get a solid black and white mask. If the image is no good, it won't be possible, but if it was shot properly, you'd manage to get a decent result. The closer you pull the sliders to the center, the denser the mask. You can pull them apart to preserve fine details. Press OK when you're done.

Problem is, when you intensify a mask like this, you get rough edges, and the Select & Mask prompt is there to help you fix it. Don't forget to pick a proper preview kind to see what's going on. Depending on what's going on, you might need to move a few sliders. If the edge is rough and hard, use the Smooth and the Feather sliders. Smoothing value should be around 3 to 6, and you should definitely avoid large numbers while feathering because the effect is rather drastic. I don't usually go higher than 1, otherwise, the edge will be too soft.

If there's a dark rim around the image, you'll need to move the Shift Edge slider to the left to make it go away. That's pretty much all you need, but feel free to play around with the sliders to get a good grip on how it works. If there are some holes in the image, you can fill them with the Brush Tool. It's inevitable if there was something green, like a green color cast in the original image. Press OK when you're finished.

Now all that's left is manual work. First of all, the image on the top, which is masked, is not the original image, it has all the greens desaturated. That's because of the green spill, the green color casts that end up on people and objects when you shoot them next to a green screen. It means that if there was something green in the image that is supposed to stay, you'd have to restore the image to its original state. You can switch to the image – always check what's active, the image or its mask and use the History Brush on it to get all the greens back. But it doesn't mean you'll get to see them, because all the green stuff might also end up under the mask so that you won't be able to see through. Switch to the mask and erase, or just use a white brush on the areas where you need to restore the original image if you need it.

The final question – what about hair? Can any of the actions do wonders on hair? No, not really. There's no magic in Photoshop, and hair is a delicate thing. You can get a basic mask, but you'll have to twiddle with it yourself. I'll run the second action and move the sliders apart first to see all the details. Then I'll try to preserve as much hair as possible, and I'll also set all the sliders in the Select&Mask prompt to zero. Now what we have here is a relatively decent mask, but it might require manual tweaking with the Levels or even Brushes in different blending modes, but that's advanced masking and it doesn't have to do anything with the actions this video is about. I'm only showing you what kind of result you can achieve with them.

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A detailed description of the contents:

SET: CHROMAKEY ISOLATION

Action: Chromakey_isolation
Type: Action, semi-automatic
When to run: on a chroma key green screen in need of removal
Requires to run: RGB 8-bit image with no selections. Can be run on a layer, just click on the "Don't flatten" button twice when prompted.
What it does: by using the Lab mode and some blending modes, the action removes anything that is green from an image
Output: a white background with a masked layer on top, where the green color is masked and the rest can be seen
User intervention: you get a Levels window where you can adjust the mask by moving the sliders
Possible alteration: you can stop the Levels window from popping up by removing the respective step, and you can replace the white Background with any color by adjusting the Fill step (the last step in the action). You can also add a Hue/Saturation adjustment on top to desaturate all the greens – that will help with the green spill. You can also adjust the mask with the Select&Mask interface to make it smoother, to contract or expand it, etc.

Action 2: Chromakey_isolation_plus
Type: Action, semi-automatic
When to run: on a chroma key green screen in need of removal
Requires to run: RGB 8-bit image with no selections or layers
What it does: by using the Lab mode and some blending modes, the action removes anything that is green from an image
Output: 3 layers: a masked layer on the top, where the green spill has been corrected and the background is not visible, the middle layer – a white solid color fill, and the original layer underneath in case you need it later.
User intervention: you get a Levels window where you can adjust the mask by moving the sliders, the Select&Mask prompt where you correct the mask if its edge is too rough. The rest of the work is manual, both on the image and its mask. You can use the History Brush on the top layer (not on its mask) to restore the initial saturation of the greens.
Possible alteration: you can stop the Levels window from popping up by removing the respective step, and you can replace the white Background with any color by adjusting the Fill step (the last step in the action).

The actions don't create any alpha channels as they just get you started with isolation – there probably will be some trash on the background left and I doubt the edges will look perfect straight away. The first action, which is the most basic, removes all that is green from the image, not by deleting it, but by masking. The second actions lets you tweak the mask and smooth the edges to some extent.

If the images are not so good, you might want to use the second action in the set, which intensifies the mask with the Levels to make the isolation better, and also helps you to deal with green spill and rough edges. If the screen is too dark and not so green, neither of the actions will work wonders, as there's no magic: if the screen is not green, it will not be removed.

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